Haider

Haider

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out of 5
Viewers

Rating

4.5
4.5 out of 5

Overview

  • Film Name : Haider
  • Language : Bollywood
  • Release Date : October 2nd, 2014

This is an adaptation of William Shakespeare's 'Hamlet', Haider - a young man returns home to Kashmir on receiving news of his father's disappearance. Not only does he learn that security forces have detained his father for harboring militants, but that his mother is in a relationship with his very own uncle. Intense drama follows between mother and son as both struggle to come to terms with news of his father's death. Soon Haider learns that his uncle is responsible for the gruesome murder, what follows is his journey to avenge his father's death.

Review

Movie review: Haider is intense, disturbing, and not your regular Bollywood movie The movie tells the story of Haider (Shahid) who finds out that his peace-loving, life-saving doctor father (Narendra Jha) has been arrested by the Indian Army. He returns from Aligarh (where he was studying poetry, a passion he shares with his father) to realise that his mother (Tabu) and uncle (Kay Kay Menon) are behind a conspiracy that resulted in his father's disappearance. We have seen in Maqbool and Omkara how wonderfully Bhardwaj takes up the bard's plays and weaves them passionately into a completely different cultural milieu. With Haider, Vishal does better. The film paints Kashmir in a haunting colour, so true to the troubles there. The usual whites and dark hues of frames are there in the Valley (usual in cinematic sense when you portray dark emotions) but even the colourful frames blaringly outline the feelings of revengeful, hurt and disturbed souls. Bhardwaj and Kashmiri journalist Basharat Peer co-wrote the film's screenplay and they must be praised for their courage to speak strongly about what is happening in Kashmir. Haider goes beyond Bollywood's Pakistan bashing for Kashmir's troubles and speaks about the alleged atrocities of the Indian Army on Kashmiris. Haider jokes about 'chutzpah'--pronounced as 'chootspaa' in the movie--and equates it to AFSPA (Armed Forces Special Powers Act, the security law which gives armed forces immunity from prosecution while operating in the militancy-hit areas but has been criticised by human rights groups). As for performances, Vishal Bhardwaj brings out the best of Shahid Kapoor and Shraddha Kapoor, a journalist in the movie. Shahid looks a little out of place in the beginning but the traumatic role rubs onto him with time. Shahid's acting in Haider could well undo his several Bollywood mistakes (read Phata Poster Nikhla Hero and the likes).